Vehicular access to Corpus Christi beaches prohibited until July 7, Nueces County officials say

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July 1, 2020Updated: July 1, 2020 2:47 p.m.

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On Tuesday, Nueces County officials announced in a news release that they will temporarily restrict vehicular access on Corpus Christi and Port Aransas beaches until July 7 to help slow the spread of the statewide COVID-19 spike.

Bob Owen

Long before Port Aransas played host to thousands of annual spring breakers, it was a fisherman's playground and a family vacation spot where only the boats were fast. The archived photographs of Port Aranasas in the gallery date as far back as 1923.2of63Long before Port Aransas played host to thousands of annual spring breakers, it was a fisherman’s playground and a family vacation spot where only the boats were fast. The archived photographs of Port Aranasas in the gallery date as far back as 1923.San Antonio Express-News3of63

Fishing off a jetty was a popular in 1930 as it is today.4of63Fishing off a jetty was a popular in 1930 as it is today.San Antonio Express-News

This was the view looking in from a channel at Port Aransas long before spring break existed (March, 1930).5of63This was the view looking in from a channel at Port Aransas long before spring break existed (March, 1930).San Antonio Express-News6of63

Here is what speed boats looked like in the early 20th century.7of63Here is what speed boats looked like in the early 20th century.San Antonio Express-News

Port Aransas 8of63Port Aransas “highway” to the beach in 1931.San Antonio Express-News9of63

A line of old Model Ts are parked near a jetty where two women fish.10of63A line of old Model Ts are parked near a jetty where two women fish.San Antonio Express-News

Workers lay the power and telephone cables across Corpus Christi Channel at Port Aransas.11of63Workers lay the power and telephone cables across Corpus Christi Channel at Port Aransas.San Antonio Express-News12of63

13of63“This tiny miss finds the beach at Port Aransas just right to play with pail and shovel,” read the cut line of this photo when it was featured in 1931.San Antonio Express-News

Children in their bathing suits play in the sand on the beach of Port Aransas.14of63Children in their bathing suits play in the sand on the beach of Port Aransas.San Antonio Express-News15of63

Fish the size of women testified to a fisherman's paradise in 1931.16of63Fish the size of women testified to a fisherman’s paradise in 1931.San Antonio Express-News

Tarpon, sailfish, mackerel, kingfish and more filled the docks throughout the year.17of63Tarpon, sailfish, mackerel, kingfish and more filled the docks throughout the year.San Antonio Express-News18of63

Dr. W.E. Nesbit of San Antonio qualified for membership in the Port Aransas Light Tackle Club with this second medal winning fish.19of63Dr. W.E. Nesbit of San Antonio qualified for membership in the Port Aransas Light Tackle Club with this second medal winning fish.San Antonio Express-News

Port Aransas boasted its own telephone exchange system with long distance connection with Bell systems. The building was funded by Gail Borden Munsill (of the Borden dairy empire), who enjoyed fishing and boating there.20of63Port Aransas boasted its own telephone exchange system with long distance connection with Bell systems. The building was funded by Gail Borden Munsill (of the Borden dairy empire), who enjoyed fishing and boating there.San Antonio Express-News21of63

Boating the 22of63Boating the “finest surf in Texas,” Port Aransas attracted vacationers in the 1930s.San Antonio Express-News

Flash forward fifty years to beach goers in 1987.23of63Flash forward fifty years to beach goers in 1987.San Antonio Express-News24of63

Mustang Island is known for dunes that dwarf men.25of63Mustang Island is known for dunes that dwarf men.Sports Illustrated

This photo is from the Farley Boat building plant in the 1930s. The Farley brothers began building their renowned boats for tarpon fishing in 1915.26of63This photo is from the Farley Boat building plant in the 1930s. The Farley brothers began building their renowned boats for tarpon fishing in 1915.San Antonio Express-News27of63

Marie Farley's family came to Port Aransas in 1910, and her family launched the popular Farley boat building company.28of63Marie Farley’s family came to Port Aransas in 1910, and her family launched the popular Farley boat building company.San Antonio Express-News

They're off to a wild day of fishing during the Tarpon Rodeo in 1932, now known as the Deep Sea Round-up.29of63They’re off to a wild day of fishing during the Tarpon Rodeo in 1932, now known as the Deep Sea Round-up.San Antonio Express-News30of63

Texas Governor Ross Sterling takes a party out to fish on one of the state cruisers. (1931)31of63Texas Governor Ross Sterling takes a party out to fish on one of the state cruisers. (1931)San Antonio Express-News

By 1989, yachts ran deep-sea fishing trips.32of63By 1989, yachts ran deep-sea fishing trips.San Antonio Express-News33of63

Two boats are pictured off the coast in 1930, where legend has it that a hundred years prior, a pirate known as Capt. Jean Lafitte ran these waters.34of63Two boats are pictured off the coast in 1930, where legend has it that a hundred years prior, a pirate known as Capt. Jean Lafitte ran these waters.San Antonio Express-News

From a hotel on Mustang Island, this was a view of the S.S. Florence Luckenbach at the docks of Port Aransas, 1923.35of63From a hotel on Mustang Island, this was a view of the S.S. Florence Luckenbach at the docks of Port Aransas, 1923.San Antonio Express-News36of63

Men unload lumber from the S.S. Florence Luckenbach at Port Aransas, Monday, July 9, 1923.37of63Men unload lumber from the S.S. Florence Luckenbach at Port Aransas, Monday, July 9, 1923.San Antonio Express-News

This photo montage of the Luckenbach Line was assembled in 1923. The ship was torpedoed and sunk by a Japanese submarine while en route from Madras to New York in 1942.38of63This photo montage of the Luckenbach Line was assembled in 1923. The ship was torpedoed and sunk by a Japanese submarine while en route from Madras to New York in 1942.San Antonio Express-News39of63

40of63“Two silver king fish brought to gaff at the same time at Port Aransas.” 1930San Antonio Express-News

This man is caught with a successful string of fish, 1930.41of63This man is caught with a successful string of fish, 1930.San Antonio Express-News42of63

The 43of63The “Diabla” was owned by WM. Flato of Kingsville, Texas. It came in second place boat race from Galveston to Corpus Christi, circa 1931.San Antonio Express-News

A young man and a boy stand next to a strung up shark in 1930.44of63A young man and a boy stand next to a strung up shark in 1930.San Antonio Express-News45of63

In 1930, Ike Johnson was the oldest resident, guide and chief booster for Port Aransas. He claimed to have seen more than 100 years of life.46of63In 1930, Ike Johnson was the oldest resident, guide and chief booster for Port Aransas. He claimed to have seen more than 100 years of life.San Antonio Express-News

This 1920s photo documents the beginnings of oil tanks and a water tower from the roof of a warehouse at deep water.47of63This 1920s photo documents the beginnings of oil tanks and a water tower from the roof of a warehouse at deep water.San Antonio Express-News48of63

A drilling rig in 198149of63A drilling rig in 1981San Antonio Express-News

An undeveloped view of Harbor Island from Port Aransas50of63An undeveloped view of Harbor Island from Port AransasSan Antonio Express-News51of63

Classic automobiles roll up to a fishing pier in Port Aransas, May 1955.52of63Classic automobiles roll up to a fishing pier in Port Aransas, May 1955.San Antonio Express-News

Taken in 1958, this photo shows how Port Aransas looked a few years before Hurricane Carla.53of63Taken in 1958, this photo shows how Port Aransas looked a few years before Hurricane Carla.San Antonio Express-News54of63

What are they doing? Catching sand crabs in 1979.55of63What are they doing? Catching sand crabs in 1979.San Antonio Express-News

These 56of63These “winter Texans” fish for flounder off the pier, November 1992.San Antonio Express-News57of63

Twenty-three fisherman caught 206 fish most of them sharks, on this summer day in Port Aransas, 1987.58of63Twenty-three fisherman caught 206 fish most of them sharks, on this summer day in Port Aransas, 1987.San Antonio Express-News

These sharks, laid out on the Dolphin Docks, were caught off the coast in the summer of 1987.59of63These sharks, laid out on the Dolphin Docks, were caught off the coast in the summer of 1987.San Antonio Express-News60of63

The line for the ferryboat from Aransas Pass to the island (pictured here in 1985) could be very, very long. Very long.61of63The line for the ferryboat from Aransas Pass to the island (pictured here in 1985) could be very, very long. Very long.San Antonio Express-News

A lone spring breaker at Port Aransas, 198562of63A lone spring breaker at Port Aransas, 1985San Antonio Express-News63of63

On Tuesday, Nueces County officials announced in a news release that they will temporarily restrict vehicular access on Corpus Christi and Port Aransas beaches until July 7 to help slow the spread of the coronavirus.

The temporary restriction of vehicular access will begin at 6 a.m. Friday and will end at 6 a.m. on Tuesday, July 7. The vehicular restrictions include golf carts and all-terrain vehicles. The Seashore at Padre Island National Seashore will be closed to all visitors beginning 8 p.m. Thursday until 6 a.m. Tuesday, the park announced in a Facebook post on Wednesday.

READ ALSO: Cameron County officials close county beach access areas on South Padre Island

Additionally, all beaches within Nueces County will have a curfew from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. starting today. The curfew will be lifted at 6 a.m. on Saturday, July 11. Residents and visitors can walk along the beach during non-curfew hours but are encouraged to continue to maintain 6 feet of distancing.

Nueces County Judge Barbara Canales is expected to sign an order Wednesday that will put the restrictions into effect immediately.

The following are the beach road closures:

– City and county Gulf Beaches from Access Road 2 thru County Road 6

– Access Road 2

-Beach Marker 62

-Newport Pass Road

– Zahn Road

– Access Road 3A

– Windward Parking Lot

– White Cap Beach

– County Road 4

– County Road 5

– Bob Hall access

– County Road 6.

Priscilla Aguirre is a general assignment reporter for MySA.com | [email protected] | @CillaAguirre

Priscilla Aguirre is a general assignment reporter for mysa.com. Follow her work @CillaAguirre.